Playing with situation

I had previously researched about minimalist artists and their focus on the momentary conideicnes being a part of their art work. When I was in the studio, the light started to pass across my large white painting. The shadow which was cast started to act like a barrier in an of itself. This has started my thinking on how situation and the LOCATION of my work should seriously be considered.

‘Bars in Situ’
Experimental photography
2017
By Ruth Linnell
‘Bars in Situ’
Experimental photography
2017
By Ruth Linnell

The work really reminded me of Kishio Suga’s work ‘Situated Underlying Existence’ which laid plastic sheets on the ground and allowed the light of the gallery space to be a part of the work. As I was researching into this artist I found out he was a part of the Mono-ha movement which grew in Japan.

‘Situated Underlying Existence’ 2014 by Kishio Suga

Mono-ha was concerned with ‘not making’, as it was argued by Lee Ufan (founder) that the need for an ARTIST to make things had been made void by the introduction of technology.  In his own practise he ‘rejected traditional ideas of representation in favour of revealing the world as it is by engaging with materials and exploring their properties’. I recently saw Ufan’s work at the  ‘Everything at Once’ Exhibition at the Strand. He displayed both ‘Dialogue – silence’,2013 and ‘Dialouge’, 2017. I was particularly interested with the presentation of a blank canvas in one of his pieces. When studying minimalism both Greenberg and Fried argue that the object itself cannot be the work. They suggest that the object has to become something new, however, here we see Ufan breaking these rules.

‘Dialogue’ 2017 by Lee Ufan
Photography of ‘Everything at Once’ Exhibition taken by Ruth Linnell
‘Dialogue-silence’ 2013 by Lee Ufan
Photography of ‘Everything at Once’ Exhibition taken by Ruth Linnell

‘The name mono-ha was coined slightly derogatorily by a journalist in response to the lack of polish and perceived lack of skill displayed in the making of the work. As the movement gained international recognition, and through its association with arte povera, mono-ha came to be widely respected as a movement that was critically engaged.’ – Tate

I have started to consider how this concept of appropriating objects could work in presenting the viewer with ‘barriers’. I recently found some sheets of mesh which I have take from the skip. Im unsure exactly how I want to see them used but they also present an emotive reaction by themselves (Much like ‘Curtain (for William and Peter)’ 1969 by Melvin Edwards.)

‘Found Mesh’
Process photography
By Ruth Linnell
‘Found Mesh’
Process photography
By Ruth Linnell

Bibliography:

Please see: White White White

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